Single Sign-On Epiphany

When I wrote about my experience setting up AD Single Sign-On for Linux, I said the next step was to extend the transparent SSO experience into WordPress. The biggest reason for that—I thought—was so that the WordPress server could then impersonate the logged-in user to pull resources from our SharePoint server (using SharePoint Web Services) and include them on WP pages. Basically a WordPress front-end with SharePoint doing some Digital Asset Management duties on the back-end.

The epiphany I just had is that it wouldn’t be WordPress connecting to SharePoint, it would be PHP, which already knows who the user is, thanks to the Kerberos authentication I already have set up. I don’t need to tackle the WordPress part before I can build the SharePoint part.

Transparent SSO to WordPress is a benefit mainly for content creators, editors, and admins—those are a small percentage of my total user base, and managing their accounts is relatively easy.

Published by Jeff Garretson

Husband, father. Data Scientist. Explorer of Powerful Ideas. Faith and Reason in one package.